Firefox 3.5.1 released!

Mozilla Firefox
Image via Wikipedia

Yes! Firefox 3.5.1 is released, finally. Included in the release notes are the fixes that we have been waiting for. Coming from the release notes, Firefox 3.5.1 is said to fix the following issues:

  • Security issues
  • Stability issues
  • And… an issue that was making 3.5 version long time to load.

The action was really fast. Sure, we always like that kind of receptiveness from a software company. We have seen how Mozilla tackled this problem and how they immediately resolved the issue. I assume this puts the dot ending the issue. The complete list of changes made in Firefox 3.5.1 is here. As usual, a link of the fresh and crispy copy of Firefox 3.5.1 version has been available at our downloads link page.

Thanks.

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ShiretokoPv3 up for test (Firefox 3.5 bugfix update)

The generic globe logo used when Firefox is co...
Image via Wikipedia

The bug fixin’ job for Firefox 3.5 is getting hotter and hotter. People are getting busier at bugzilla. Another build has been spun, dubbed as ShiretokoPv3, presumed to include yet another patch. I am getting more of the impression that this is not really just a simple bug. The problem seems to be dead serious. Anyhow, you may check the updates on the issue here. I added a link to ShiretokoPv3 at the downloads page, if you want to participate in the test. You can also give your feedback to the bugzilla team.

For everybody’s info, the logo at the right side is the so called “generic globe logo” which is used when Firefox is compiled without the official branding. That is also the logo or icon that you will get if you use the Shiretoko version. Heads-up!

(wink).

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Mdigger Reader

Really, REALLY BIG RSS feed button

If you are hooked to online content such as rss feeds, texts, images and podcasts then Mdigger is for you. This free service that lets you download and feast your eyes on reading the latest content of your choice. I personally use this app on my Facebook account (thru their facebook app), on my PC and on my phone. Instead of visiting my favorite sites one after another what I do is check if they have RSS options and add it to my collection at Mdigger’s website. All the information I need from sites like Lifehacker.com, Webupon.com, Gizmodo.com and Makeuseof.com can all be found on one single RSS reader wherever I am, in and out of office both on phone and my notebook. Mdigger has a huge catalog of mclips (selection of information and online content) to choose from. If there is a site that’s not on their list just log on to your Mdigger account and simply add it to your own set of RSS feeds and Mdigger will take care of the rest, just make sure that the site you want to add supports RSS.

To avail the free service, registration at Mdigger is required (no strings attached). What you get is an account, allowed to add up to 30 RSS Feeds (can be increased though, by requesting for more). Fair enough, I think. At the moment their client app supports Windows (Vista/Xp) and Mac. On mobiles, iPhones are supported natively requiring only your browser while with Windows Mobile, you can get the client also from their downloads page. Alternatively, its also available at the download links page on this blog.

Test drive the app on your PC or Mobile. It’s one little software that I really find indispensable. For more info on RSS, here is my gift – RSS on Wikipedia.

Thanks.

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Microsoft VP fires back at Google on Chrome OS

Image representing Google as depicted in Crunc...

Image via CrunchBase

While scavenging for some fresh information at Gizmodo.com (gadget blog), I found one very interesting post. It’s about Microsoft’s VP throwing out a statement over Google‘s recent announcement on Google Chrome OS Project.

Image representing Microsoft as depicted in Cr...
Image via CrunchBase

Information coming from Gizmodo says:

Microsoft‘s Vice President of Developer and Platform Evangelism, Walid Abu-Hadba, explained in an interview what he thinks Google’s real motivation for creating the Chrome OS might be, and according to him, it’s not out of love for the consumer.Abu-Hadba’s statement that “Most of what Google does is defensive” isn’t actually the tech world’s most hypocritical statement (when was the last time Microsoft created something that wasn’t a version of an already-successful product?). He means that everything Google does is designed to keep their core business, search and advertising, growing and dominant. The impetus behind Chrome OS, according to him, isn’t to encourage simpler and easier computing, but weirdly enough, to distract other companies from attacking its own cash cow.

This is an interesting conversation because Microsoft has been doing just that, attacking Google’s core, with Bing—yet Abu-Habda doesn’t see Bing as a similar distraction to stop others from attacking Microsoft’s core business, Windows. So why is Microsoft allowed to venture into new-for-them waters with projects like Xbox, Zune, Silverlight, Bing and more, while Google is an inherently defensive company for announcing a ballsy new project of their own?

Microsoft might just be a bit nervous about Chrome OS, which we don’t think is really warranted at this point. Microsoft’s got an outrageously dominant OS marketshare, and seeing as how we know just about nothing about Chrome OS, it’s quite a bit soon to be launching attacks at a product that may well not be a competitor at all.

— material by Dan Nozowitz

Image representing Gizmodo as depicted in Crun...
Image via CrunchBase

The battle is becoming more and more interesting. I am getting excited on what the future will bring. Keep posted.

– for this post, I would like to invoke the “Creative Commons License“. Direct link to the article is here.

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